Curation_challenges_licensing

(Go back to the main ebook curation page)

Curation-challenges-licensing

Key LICENSING themes: (from infographic)

  • Digital Rights Management
  • Restrictions on textbooks
  • Who licences: library, academic department or end user?

References to support themes

General

From the University of Chester ebook curation case study
Some suppliers work on an access credit system where titles are allocated a specified number of credits very few titles use their full credit allocation. Others work on a multi-user or limited consecutive user licences. The library has noted that suppliers are providing fewer credits per title, some publishers are withdrawing their titles from ebook collections and some publishers are setting up their own platforms and collections.

From the University of Chester ebook curation case study

The University of Chester operates a partnership service with a local hospital library that provides services for both HE and NHS users. The hospital library shares the university’s library catalogue, and this has caused some issues with access to e-books. Collections bought by the partners are restricted to use by just their staff or students or users, and there have been some issues with clearly identifying user access rights.

From the University of Hertfordshire ebook curation case study
At the moment some of the key curation challenges are:
Managing the complexity, variety and changing nature of license agreements

From the University of Hertfordshire ebook curation case study
When the University acquires an ebook from Dawson or EBL it is typically licensed (‘credits’ are allocated) for up to 325 or 400 uses (=access online or download) per year depending on service. This is re-set at the beginning of each year. However some publishers have recently started to reduce this number down to 100 credits. For high demand titles and where there are large student cohorts, these credits may be used up very quickly, so the University has put regular monitoring arrangements in place to alert to the need for rapid procurement of additional ‘copies’ to ensure continuity of access.
A recent development by some publishers to limit the number of concurrent users for some e-textbooks flies in the face of the advantages of ebooks for students by posing barriers to anytime on demand access and an unworkable licensing model. The University is looking at this with publishers and aggregators to ensure student experience is not compromised by this incongruous model.

Digital Rights Management

Restrictions on textbooks

From the University of Hertfordshire ebook curation case study
Some content providers are increasingly looking to market directly to academics, and are making some textbooks unavailable through licensing models.

From the University of York ebook curation case study

A limiting factor in terms of e provision of textbooks is the cost and limits in licensing (e.g. restrictions of simultaneous access)

Who licences: library, academic department or end user?

From the University of Hertfordshire ebook curation case study
Some content providers are increasingly looking to market directly to academics, and are making some textbooks unavailable through licensing models. In these newly merging models materials can be downloaded (e.g. to iPad) for the duration of the course, and licensing is based on individual logins set up by the publisher rather than through a recognised route such as Athens or Shibboleth.

From: JISC TechWatch: Preparing for Effective Adoption and Use of Ebooks in Education,
November 2012.

[page 34]

A range of licensing models cover ebooks and how they can be used in reading, lending, copying, printing and transferring to mobile devices or e-readers. Users may often confuse “personal”licensing with “educational” licensing.

With traditional books, it is very easy to make and share copies using a photocopier. As might be expected, users often want to do similar things with ebooks. Different ebook licences allow users to undertake different kinds of copying, but there is an inconsistency in how these licences work and whether the copying is for personal use or for use with learners. Some ebook licences allow readers to make PDF copies of part of a book, which can then be distributed to others. However, some licences only permit users to make PDF copies for personal use. Copying an entire ebook and transferring it to a mobile device (or another computer) is another activity that may be prohibited by the ebook licence. Some ebooks can be transferred via a central service. Other ebooks can be downloaded to users’ computers and then copied and transferred to their mobile devices.